Athens household power cost below European average in September

The cost of electricity for Athenian households in September remained below the average of 33 European capitals, a latest monthly survey conducted by HEPI, the Household Energy Price Index, has shown.

Athens was ranked 16th in terms of retail electricity cost among the 33 European capitals, but rose to 11th place when purchasing power was taken into account.

Electricity cost increases continued in September in Athens and 12 other European capitals. In Athens, the cost of electricity rose 1.15 percent compared to the previous month.

As for natural gas, the setting is quite different, Athens being the 4th most expensive European capital city, following a 29 percent retail price increase in September compared to August, the third-biggest rise, according to the HEPI survey.

 

 

August floating-rate electricity tariffs up 14% in Athens

Retail electricity price increases were highest in Athens in August, a monthly 33-city Household Energy Price Index survey conducted by energy research and consultancy firm Vaasaett has shown.

Athens’ retail electricity price increase for August was estimated at 34 percent, a rise that falls to 14 percent if fixed tariffs, far more expensive, are not factored into the calculations.

In Athens, fixed-rate tariffs are priced two to four times higher than floating-rate tariff deals offered by electricity suppliers.

Athens’ 14 percent price increase in August is a more realistic result than the study’s 34 percent rise, which takes into account fixed-rate deals, as virtually all consumers are not favoring fixed-tariff agreements given the far greater cost entailed.

The study bases its results on electricity tariffs offered by respective city market leaders, based on most recent market shares.

Fixed tariff-rate electricity deals are becoming increasingly uncommon, and more expensive, throughout Europe as suppliers are hesitating to offer such deals given the heightened level of market uncertainty.

In Greece, state subsidies are only available for consumers with floating-rate tariff agreements, making fixed tariff-rate deals even less popular.

 

Athens among 4 European cities with July price cuts

Household electricity prices in Athens fell by 7 percent in July, month to month, making the Greek capital one of just four European cities to register price reductions last month, a latest monthly survey conducted by HEPI, the Household Energy Price Index, has shown.

Retail electricity prices in Athens dropped to 0.218 euros per KWh, below the European average of 0.284 euros per KWh and slightly above the average retail electricity price for 33 cities included in the study, which ended July at 0.217 euros.

Athens was ranked 21st among the HEPI survey’s 33 participating cities in terms of retail electricity cost.

The Greek government’s electricity subsidy program for June and July exceeded 730 million euros per month and will cost over 1.1 billion euros for August.

Besides Athens, three other European cities experienced retail electricity price reductions in July: Vienna (-20%); Madrid (-12%); and Rome (-10%).

Europe’s highest retail electricity prices were recorded in London (0.630 euros per KWh); Copenhagen (0.530 euros per KWh); Rome (0.459 euros per KWh); Amsterdam (0.419 euros per KWh) and Prague (0.409 euros per KWh).

July’s biggest retail electricity price increases in Europe, according to the HEPI survey, were registered by: Vilnius (44%); Amsterdam (37%); London (25%); and Sofia (24%).

HEPI: Greece’s power cost in June below European average

Electricity prices for Athenian households dropped 2 percent in June, compared to a month earlier, according to the results of a monthly study conducted by the Household Energy Price Index, covering 33 European cities.

The cost of electricity in Athens in June remained below the European average, according to the study, which ranked the Greek capital in 18th place among the 33 European cities surveyed.

Greece’s electricity subsidy program has helped contain energy costs in Athens to levels lower than many other European cities, the HEPI results highlighted.

The cost of electricity for households in Greece last month averaged 0.233 euros per kWh, below the EU-27 average of 0.2708 euros per kWh and the average of 0.256 euros per kWh for the 33 European cities included in the HEPI survey.

Helsinki and Tallinn recorded the biggest electricity price increases in June, up 14 percent, month to month, the HEPI survey showed. Minsk, Paris and Stockholm followed with 5 percent increases. Rome was next with a 4 percent increase. Riga and London recorded 2 percent increases.

On the contrary, Amsterdam recorded the biggest electricity price reduction in June, down 11 percent, followed by Berlin (7%), Oslo (4%), Vienna (3%) and Athens (2%), the HEPI figures showed.

 

Electricity cost up 13% in May, Athens prices among Europe’s lowest

The cost of electricity for households in Athens increased by 13 percent in May, compared to the previous month, but prices in the Greek capital remain among Europe’s lowest, according to a monthly study conducted by the Household Energy Price Index, covering 33 European cities.

Ljubljana registered the biggest electricity price increase for households in May, up 29 percent, followed by Riga (26%), Dublin (18%), Athens (13%) and Prague (6%).

In terms of electricity price levels in May, Athens was ranked 16th among the 33 cities on the HEPI list, with a price of 0.2377 euros per KWh, below the EU-27 average of 0.2717 euroe per KWh.

The cost of electricity in London in May was 0.4975 euros per KWh, followed by Rome (0.4932 euros per KWh), Copenhagen (0.4871 euros per KWh) and Vienna (0.4744 euros per KWh).

Athens’ relatively lower price in May was attributed to the government’s subsidy policy, while the 13 percent price increase in May resulted from a reduction of subsidies in May compared to April as a result of a de-escalation in wholesale electricity prices.

The Greek government’s subsidy package for June will be worth slightly less than that of May.

Athens among Europe’s ten most expensive cities for energy

Athens ranked among Europe’s ten most expensive cities for electricity and natural gas last December, according to a monthly Household Energy Price Index (HEPI) report.

The data, collected for the HEPI report by the regulatory authorities for energy of Austria (Energie Control) and Hungary (MEKH) in association with energy consulting firm VaasaEET, highlighted the skyrocketing electricity and gas prices around Europe.

The Greek capital was ranked sixth in terms of retail electricity cost in December, Athenian households paying an average of €0.315 per KWh.

Copenhagen was Europe’s most expensive city for electricity with a December average price of nearly €0.40 per KWh. The Danish capital was followed by London (€0.396), Brussels (€0.37), Berlin (€0.362) and Amsterdam (€0.343). These price levels include taxes.

Electricity prices averaged €0.24 for the EU and €0.23 for the total of 33 cities included in the survey.

The lowest electricity prices were recorded in Kiev (€0.0546), Belgrade (€0.0811), Budapest (€0.105), Podgorica (€0.105), Valletta (€0.123) and Sofia ((€0.123).

Athens recorded the biggest electricity price increase in December, compared to November, which reached 22 percent. The Greek capital was followed by Stockholm (17%), Warsaw (12%) and Amsterdam (11%).

Athens was also high on the list of natural gas prices for households, ranking seventh in December with an average price of €0.12 per KWh.

Stockholm topped this list with an average price of €0.234 per KWh, followed by Copenhagen (€0.194), Amsterdam (€0.19), Bern (€0.143), Rome (€0.13) and Vienna (€0.125).

Europe’s lowest natural gas prices, ranging from €0.025 and €0.05, were recorded in Kiev, Budapest, Belgrade, Bucharest, Warsaw, Bratislava, Zagreb and Riga.