Energy minister calls emergency meeting, heatwave set to peak

Energy minister Kostas Skrekas is due to visit power grid operator IPTO’s control center in Athens today for an emergency meeting he has ordered to deal with grid sufficiency issues raised by the prolonged heatwave conditions, expected to become even more acute during the week.

Prime Minister Kyriakos Mitsotakis will participate in the emergency meeting along with the head officials of RAE, the Regulatory Authority of Energy, power grid operator IPTO, distribution network operator DEDDIE/HEDNO, and power utility PPC.

The grid is expected to face unprecedented conditions in coming days as electricity demand peaks to reach record levels, prompted by the extreme weather conditions.

The energy ministry has already urged the public to exercise restraint in electricity consumption over the next few days as a means of helping the pressured grid cope with the heatwave’s demands.

The energy minister also staged an emergency meeting yesterday morning with officials of the aforementioned energy sector companies.

Electricity demand today is expected to peak at 9,600 MW, at around 9pm, well over the average peak of 8,115 MW in the first half of 2021.

RAE rethinks 30% wholesale price clause swing limit for bills

RAE, the Regulatory Authority for Energy, appears set to adopt changes proposed by electricity market players for the authority’s package concerning new electricity bill pricing rules, including an appeal by suppliers urging the authority to avoid imposing a 30 percent limit on a clause enabling them to increase or decrease prices in accordance with wholesale price swings.

The authority’s proposal for this 30 percent limit, announced on July 16, prompted considerable reaction from electricity suppliers, who warned it would stifle competition, adding the Greek energy exchange does not possess tools that can offset wholesale-related cost.

Electricity suppliers have incorporated clauses into their electricity bills enabling price adjustments in accordance with wholesale price level increases or decreases.

The imposition of a 30 percent limit, up or down, would inflict even greater financial pain on smaller electricity suppliers, protesting market players warned.

RAE’s revised rules, seeking to offer consumers greater electricity-bill clarity and price-comparing ability, will be forwarded for a follow-up consultation procedure, possibly as early as this Friday. Otherwise, the procedure is seen commencing within August.

RES investors in rush to avoid €35,000/MWh guarantee cost

Thousands of RES investors already holding producer certificates are racing against time to avoid letter-of-guarantee payments of 35,000 euros per MW, which will be avoided if they manage to submit complete applications for finalized connection offers by a February 28, 2022 deadline to distribution network operator DEDDIE/HEDNO or power grid operator IPTO.

This same deadline applies for imminent producer certificates to be issued through last month’s application cycle. RAE, the Regulatory Authority for Energy, has already begun processing these applications submitted in June. If these investors miss the February deadline for finalized connection offers, they too will also face letter of guarantee costs.

From the next cycle – in October – onwards, most applicants will need to submit letters of guarantee worth 35,000 euros per MW. Investors behind smaller projects with capacities of less than 1 MW, strategic investments, projects for public-benefit purposes, as well as projects developed by local authorities and foundations, will be exempted from the upcoming letter of guarantee requirement.

Its prospect is expected to increase the pressure on DEDDIE/HEDNO and IPTO, expected to face an increased inflow of applications over the next few months as investors scramble to meet the February 28 deadline.

The 35,000-euro per MWh letter of guarantee is being introduced to prevent saturation caused by applicants submitting bids but not following up with actual project development.

‘DAPEEP should manage PPAs platform, not energy exchange’

Preparations for the country’s Market Reform Plan, expected to soon be submitted to the European Commission for approval, have prompted a reaction from RES market operator DAPEEP, asserting it should be appointed operator of green-energy power purchase agreements (PPAs) instead of the energy exchange, as has been stipulated in the plan, now undergoing public consultation.

DAPEEP’s objection to the PPA plan, included in the Market Reform Plan, emerged at a meeting staged by RAE, the Regulatory Authority for Energy, uring discussion on the road map for domestic wholesale electricity market revisions.

DAPEEP’s operator’s chief official Yiannis Giarentis protested that the operator has supported the RES sector’s development for years, being at the helm of this market for 20 years, but has now been sidelined as green-energy PPAs, to facilitate bilateral agreements between RES producers and industrial consumers, are about to come into the picture.

RAE will now examine various proposals and views before taking a stance on the matter.

Energy storage interest enormous, applications for over 12 GW

Investment interest for the installation of energy storage units is already considerable, even though related licensing and support mechanism frameworks have yet to be established, data presented yesterday by RAE, the Regulatory Authority for Energy, has shown.

According to the data, RAE, since October, 2019, has received 123 applications for prospective energy storage and pumped storage projects representing a total of 12,229 MW.

Of these applications, 110 concern energy storage systems representing a total capacity of 9,102 MW, the RAE data showed.

To date, RAE has already issued production licenses for 38 energy storage units with a total capacity of 3,582 MW.

A further 12 applications representing 2,447 MW are for pumped storage units, not including a Terna Energy project in Amfilohia, northwestern Greece.

So far, RAE has issued three licenses for pumped storage facilities representing 807 MW.

Energy ministry officials already suspect the energy storage market may experience overheating issues, as has been the case with the RES market.

Market Reform Plan, Adequacy Report rush ahead of break

The energy ministry is striving to offer a swift response to a set of European Commission queries concerning Greece’s updated Market Reform Plan, forwarded for public consultation by RAE, the Regulatory Authority for Energy.

The energy ministry is aiming to submit a finalized plan to Brussels by the end of July, so that the European Commission can process and approve the plan before its officials take off for their summer breaks in August.

The queries forwarded by the European Commission primarily seek clarification and do not raise any fundamental issues, which has given Greek officials hope of the plan’s imminent finalization.

Brussels’ approval of the Market Reform Plan is crucial as it is one of two prerequisites faced by Athens before the government can submit an application for a support mechanism, either a Strategic Reserve, which would compensate power utility PPC for maintaining its lignite-fired power stations on emergency stand-by, or a Capacity Remuneration Mechanism.

The second requirement is Brussels’ approval of an Adequacy Report being prepared by IPTO, Greece’s power grid operator. Its finalization was originally planned for the end of July but this aim now seems set to be delayed by a week or two.

Suppliers united against RAE’s electricity-bill revision proposals

The country’s entire spectrum of electricity suppliers, from power utility PPC, vertically integrated energy groups, to independent suppliers, have all denounced electricity-bill restriction proposals made by RAE, the Regulatory Authority for Energy, which wants to offer consumers greater clarity and price-comparing ability, rejecting the proposed measures as outdated and inconsistent with European standards.

Electricity suppliers across the board contend the proposals, which offer less leeway in the shaping of offers, would stifle competition and ultimately increase tariffs for consumers.

In recent months, suppliers have been forced to activate electricity bill clauses as they have battled to cope with the impact of sharply increased natural gas prices in international markets as well as higher carbon emission right costs, all of which has led to elevated costs for consumers.

Supplier representatives, in comments to energypress, noted that RAE should have already taken other forms of action to protect consumers, pointing out systematic checks for misinformation practices, false advertising and unfair commercial policies.

The authority has proposed a 30 percent limit on clause-related increases and decreases; the termination of fixed costs, noting that, unlike tariffs, directly comparable, fixed costs tend to cause consumer confusion as they can run for one-month or four-month periods; the termination of an early-withdrawal clause, to stimulate greater consumer mobility; as well as electricity supply price inspections every three months, the objective being to counter temporary below-cost offers extended by some suppliers to lure customers.

 

RAE clause revision proposals not embraced by suppliers

A series of electricity bill-clause revisions proposed by RAE, the Regulatory Authority for Energy, seeking greater clarity and price-comparing ability for consumers, have already prompted negative reaction from suppliers, expected to lodge their complaints, in writing, to the authority by Thursday.

In recent months, suppliers have been forced to activate electricity bill clauses as they have battled to cope with the impact of sharply increased natural gas prices in international markets as well as higher carbon emission right costs, all of which has led to elevated costs for consumers.

The authority has proposed a 30 percent limit on clause-related increases and decreases; the termination of fixed costs, noting that, unlike tariffs, directly comparable, fixed costs tend to cause consumer confusion as they can run for one-month or four-month periods; the termination of an early-withdrawal clause, which would stimulate greater consumer mobility; as well as electricity supply price inspections every three months, the objective being to counter temporary below-cost offers extended by some suppliers to lure customers.

In comments to energypress, supplier representatives contended that RAE’s proposed measures would stifle competition and restrict the shaping of offers made to consumers.

RAE is seeking to standardize electricity-bill offers, which would eliminate any leeway available to suppliers for flexibility in their offers, especially when concerning fixed costs, some supplier representatives stressed.

Energy exchange’s gas market trading details forwarded for public consultation

The Hellenic Energy Exchange has forwarded for public consultation a list of proposals it has submitted to RAE, the Regulatory Authority for Energy, concerning natural gas market details ahead of the prospective energy exchange trading of gas products.

Matters addressed include the procedure to be applied to determine energy exchange  participation rights, charges and commissions for gas product transactions, professional competence requirements as well as product specification rules.

According to one proposal, an annual subscription fee of 7,000 euros will be set for participants.

Also, daily commission fees of 0.005 per MWh for gas products traded in the day-ahead and intraday markets has been proposed.

The energy exchange’s public consultation procedure is planned to end August 31.

DESFA considering 2 options for gas transportation to Epirus

Gas grid operator DESFA is examining two alternative solutions for the transportation of natural gas to Greece’s northwestern region of Epirus, one of the company’s most important projects of its ten-year development plan covering 2022 to 2031, still not finalized.

One option being considered by DESFA is an extension of a gas pipeline in west Macedonia, northern Greece, from Ptolemaida all the way to Ioannina, the Epirus prefecture’s capital.

The other solution being considered entails the development of an LNG terminal at Igoumenitsa port, from where a 50-km gas pipeline would be constructed into the Epirus region.

The options will undergo public consultation for comments and observations by market players before RAE, in conjunction with DESFA, decides which of the two will be implemented.

DESFA aims to finalize its ten-year development plan covering 2022 to 2031 within the summer before delivering it to RAE in September.

Operators react against RAE’s net profit deduction proposal

Market operators have disapproved a proposal by RAE, the Regulatory Authority of Energy, to deduct a percentage of their net profit from non-regulated activities, contending this would act as a growth disincentive.

Gas grid operator DESFA’s chief executive Maria Rita Galli expressed the company’s concerns earlier this week, during a press conference, following preceding disapproval by power grid operator IPTO just hours earlier in public consultation focused on a formula for the calculation of permitted and required ESMIE (electricity transmission system) revenue.

The DESFA chief executive told reporters the operator is currently in talks with RAE for an agreement that would satisfy both sides.

Deducting a percentage of net profit from operators represents an older approach that has generally been abandoned today, Galli pointed out. Subjecting DESFA to such a deduction would put the operator in a disadvantageous position compared to other companies.

RAE has informed this disputed deduction would be used for the benefit of electricity transmission system users.

IPTO has proposed that the authority’s deduction be limited to outlays made for non-regulated services.

Suppliers request revisions to alleviate cash-flow pressure

Electricity suppliers, facing steep and lasting wholesale electricity cost increases, which have resulted in cash-flow issues, are seeking revisions that could alleviate the pressure, in recommendations submitted to RAE, the Regulatory Authority for Energy.

Rising wholesale electricity costs have created major cash flow problems for non-vertically integrated electricity suppliers as they are being forced to pay increasing amounts for electricity and related guarantees ahead of payments, to them, by consumers.

Consumers have also felt the pinch as suppliers, seeking protection against the rising wholesale prices, have activated wholesale cost-related clauses incorporated into their supply agreements.

Solutions for both sides seem elusive at present as market forecasts do not see any price de-escalation ahead, only further increases.

In one of the recommendations forwarded to RAE, suppliers called for their cash collateral payments made to the Hellenic Energy Exchange, as a form of guarantee, to be replaced by letters of guarantee representing equivalent amounts.

Suppliers have also requested a reexamination of the clearing price and payment formula in the day-ahead and intraday markets.

They also requested extensions for surcharge payments to power grid operator IPTO and the distribution network operator DEDDIE/HEDNO.

 

Revision for Crete assets transfer to IPTO this week

The energy ministry is set to submit to Parliament a legislative revision needed for the transfer to power grid operator IPTO of distribution network operator DEDDIE/HEDNO’s assets on Crete, a pending issue that must be resolved for the launch of market activity concerning the island’s small-scale interconnection with the Peloponnese.

The transfer of DEDDIE/HEDNO’s assets on Crete to IPTO is essential for the latter to take on the responsibility of the small-scale interconnection. IPTO cannot take on this task until a 150-kV transmission line remains under the control of power utility PPC, DEDDIE/HEDNO’s parent company.

The legislative revision will be submitted to Parliament by the end of this week, barring unexpected developments, as an attachment to a draft bill concerning waste management, energypress sources informed.

In a concurrent development, RAE, the Regulatory Authority for Energy, has approved an Energy Exchange proposal concerning the island’s entry into target model markets.

The authority and other agencies involved in this procedure presented a hybrid model that will remain valid until the completion of Crete’s major-scale interconnection with Athens.

 

Usage rates revised, up 15.6% for medium-voltage consumers

New electricity transmission system usage fees, expected to be introduced in August or September, include a 15.6 percent increase for medium-voltage consumers, to 1,384 euros per MWh from 1,197 euros.

RAE, the Regulatory Authority for Energy, has endorsed the 2021 allowable earnings figure for power grid operator IPTO, increased to 211.6 million euros from 198.9 million euros in 2019.

However, IPTO officials have complained that the 211.6 million-euro figure will not be entirely collected this year as a result of bureaucratic procedures at RAE that have delayed the authority’s approval of revisions.

Based on a RAE decision reached on June 17, the system usage charge for high-voltage consumers has been set at 23,560 euros per MW, annually, from 24,062 euros, a 2 percent reduction.

The system usage rate for household consumers was increased by 3.3 percent to 0.56 euros per KWh from 0.542 euros per KWh in 2019 and 2020.

Damco Energy CCGT boost to 840 MW approved by RAE

A plan by Damco Energy, a Copelouzos group subsidiary, to increase the capacity of its prospective natural gas-fired power station in Alexandroupoli, northeastern Greece, from 662 MW to 840 MW has been approved by RAE, the Regulatory Authority for Energy.

The energy company now needs to make an investment decision, expected within the summer, before work on the project commences, sources informed. Its licensing procedure has been completed.

According to the sources, ESM, North Macedonia’s state electricity company, set to acquire a 25 percent in the Alexandroupoli natural gas-fired power station, is now at the final of its preparations and is currently performing due diligence.

Damco Energy is one of a number of companies that have not only decided to develop natural gas-fired power stations but also to boost capacities of their respective projects to over 800 MW.

Mytilineos was the first to do so with its plan for an 826-MW combined cycle gas turbine (CCGT unit) in Agios Nikolaos, Viotia, northwest of Athens, a project already being developed.

Following suit, Elpedison upgraded a licensed natural gas-fired power station plan in Thessaloniki to 826 MW, while, just weeks ago, GEK Terna and Motor Oil also announced an upgrade for their natural gas-fired power station in Komotini, northeastern Greece, a joint venture, to 877 MW.

Power utility PPC has also announced a plan to convert its new lignite-fired power station, Ptolemaida V, to a natural gas unit, planned to ultimately offer a capacity of over 1,000 MW by 2025.

The prospective natural gas-fired power stations, totaling 4.3 GW, are planned to fill the capacity gap that will be left by PPC’s withdrawal of lignite-fired power stations, exiting as part of the country’s decarbonization effort.

These new gas-fired units are also expected to export electricity to Balkan countries through grid interconnections with neighboring markets.

Ministry puts brake on RAE-licensed energy storage plans

The energy ministry is stopping the implementation of RAE (Regulatory Authority for Energy)-licensed energy storage station plans as it wants to avoid priority treatment in power grid operator IPTO’s examination of connection-term applications submitted by investors already holding production licenses.

The ministry intends to first ensure the induction of investment plans already holding production licenses into the new, soon-to-be-legislated licensing framework for energy storage units before all investment plans, old and new, are examined from scratch, to determine the processing order of IPTO connection-term applications.

According to energypress sources, the government was never in favor of a policy pursued by RAE to license energy stations despite the absence of a legislative framework for this sector.

The majority of RAE’s energy-storage licenses have been granted through an existing framework for natural gas-fired power stations, used as a surrogate framework.

According to data recently presented by RAE president Athanasios Dagoumas, the authority, since 2019, has received a total of 98 applications for energy storage, pumped storage and hybrid units representing a total capacity of 8,213 MW.

By April, this year, RAE had issued production licenses for the majority of these applications, while the examination of a further 34, representing a capacity of 4,519 MW, was pending.

Combination of events pushing electricity costs higher

Higher-priced electricity, globally, may have arrived to stay given the combination of events such as the sudden rebound of the global economy, which is intensifying demand for fuels, metals and electricity, as well as the European Green Deal, new climate change laws and more ambitious carbon neutrality targets, pushing up CO2 emission right prices.

In Greece, wholesale electricity prices have risen sharply in recent days, to levels above 100 euros per MWh, the heatwave conditions exacerbating the situation. CO2 emission right prices have reached 55 euros per ton, from 32 euros per ton at the beginning of the year. The market clearing price for June is estimated to be 79.33 euros per MWh from 59 euros per MWh in December.

Major electricity suppliers in the Greek market expect the wholesale price to settle at 83-84 euros per MWh in the next month before rising to 85 euros per MWh over the next few months, and reaching 92 euros per MWh towards the end of the year.

Wholesale price clauses included by suppliers in their agreements with consumers for protection against higher prices are well below the aforementioned projections, meaning consumers should soon expect considerably higher electricity costs if these forecasts prove to be accurate.

Even if eventual electricity cost hikes turn out to be milder, RAE, the Regulatory Authority for Energy, and the energy ministry will be bracing for a bigger wave of consumer complaints.

 

RAE effort for universal supplier cost-clause policy facing delay

RAE, the Regulatory Authority for Energy, working on a universal cost-clause policy for all electricity suppliers, to offer consumers greater electricity-bill transparency and price-comparing ability, has extended, until the end of June, a deadline it set for suppliers to deliver related market data details concerning all of 2020 and 2021, until the present.

Independent suppliers, who recently triggered wholesale price-related clauses in electricity bills to protect themselves against elevated wholesale prices, were questioned by the authority and then requested, as early as a month ago, to produce related data but have failed to deliver, instead calling for more time.

Power utility PPC was the first supplier to be summoned for questioning over its decision to trigger a CO2 cost-related clause incorporated into its electricity bills.

RAE had initially planned to stage a public consultation procedure for a universal clause policy within July, after examining the data provided by suppliers, but this plan will now be delayed.

Given the fact that overall business activity slows down severely during the August holiday period, RAE’s proposal is now not expected to be forwarded for consultation any sooner than September.

Taking into account supplier objections expected to surface during the procedure, the new cost-clause policy cannot be expected to be implemented before October.

Consumer complaints over sharp electricity cost increases and lack of transparency in electricity billing have risen considerably in recent times.

RES investment interest high in June cycle, attracting 17 GW

RES investment interest remained high in a latest cycle for  producer certificate applications offered by RAE, the Regulatory Authority for Energy, between June 1 and 10, amassing over 700 applications representing a total capacity of 17.3 GW, energypress sources have informed.

This heightened level of interest has defied the forecasts of certain analysts who expected more subdued figures as a result of lower tariff prices at a recent RES auction.

Solar energy projects represented 12.7 GW of the total, while wind energy applications made up 4.1 GW.

The level of investment interest expressed through this June cycle greatly exceeds figures registered in the preceding cycle, in February, when a total of 477 RES producer certificate applications, representing 8.86 GW, were submitted.

Also taking into account last December’s cycle, when new rules were introduced, the grand total of applications, in all three cycles, exceeds 3,000 for projects representing 71 GW.

At the current rate, a single cycle is attracting more applications than the number submitted over the course of more than a year in the past.

A 20 percent proportion of producer certificate applications submitted in the December cycle was rejected as criteria were not fully met, the most common issue being overlapping properties declared as project sites by investors.

 

Solar, wind, energy storage system costs ‘exceed’ RAE figures

The cost of installing and launching solar and wind energy facilities, as well as storage systems, exceeds levels presumed by RAE, the Regulatory Authority for Energy, RES agencies and investors have pointed out in public consultation staged by the authority on the cost of new entry for all electricity generation technologies.

RES equipment costs have not only failed to stabilize in recent times, but, on the contrary, struck an upward trajectory, RES officials highlighted.

Some public consultation participants pointed out that RAE’s figures only factor in equipment supply and construction costs without taking into account the connection costs entailed.

SEF, the Hellenic Association of Photovoltaic Companies, rejected RAE’s capital expenditure estimate for domestic roof-mounted solar panel installations, presumed to be €550,000/MW, noting this figure is extremely low and does not reflect actual market conditions.

The association also noted that RAE’s €400,000/MW CAPEX estimate for commercial PVs is also too low, contending this cost ranges between €500,000-€550,000/MW.

The capital expenditure figure for offshore wind farms is far greater than RAE’s estimate of 3.1 million euros per MW, contended ELETAEN, the Greek Wind Energy Association.

“Given the lack of relevant experience in Greece, depth of the seas, and the still-undeveloped supply chain, the €3.1m/MW estimate is probably very optimistic,” ELETAEN stated.

RAE working on common clause policy for suppliers

Following up on its intervention against power utility PPC’s recent decision to trigger a CO2 emission price-related clause for medium and low-voltage consumers, RAE, the Regulatory Authority for Energy, has now begun questioning independent suppliers over their adoption of a wholesale price-related clause.

The authority, to concurrently investigate the legality of these initiatives, has asked suppliers to forward related data concerning all of 2020 and 2021, up to the present, by the beginning of next week as part of its effort to establish a common clause policy for all suppliers that can clarify the price-comparing ability of consumers.

RAE aims to announce a new set of rules on electricity bill clauses in September, following public consultation, possibly in July.

Once RAE has examined market data expected from independent suppliers, it intends to hold a series of talks with them as of June 21.

PPC, which, just days ago, was asked by RAE to replace its CO2 price-related clause with one linked to wholesale price levels, is doing so, announcing it will also implement a 30 percent discount as of August 5 to offset, as much as possible, a price rise anticipated as a result of its adoption of the wholesale price clause.

PPC adopting wholesale market clause along with 30% discount

Power utility PPC is preparing to replace its CO2 emission right price-related clause with one linked to wholesale electricity market price levels, which, combined with a 30 percent discount, to be applied as an offsetting tool, is ultimately expected to result in a slight overall reduction in electricity bill costs for consumers.

PPC’s new pricing system, set to be implemented on August 5, was adopted following pressure from RAE, the Regulatory Authority for Energy, in its effort to enhance the price-comparing ability of consumers.

Until now, PPC has been the only supplier using a CO2-related clause in its pricing system. All other suppliers have incorporated a wholesale market-related clause into their supply agreements, as protection against increased wholesale costs.

The power utility triggered its CO2-related clause in May in response to rallying CO2 emission right prices, which resulted in electricity bill increases of between 5 and 6 percent for consumers.

This percentage increase in the cost of PPC’s electricity bills is expected to be lowered as a result of the switch to a wholesale market clause and the accompanying 30 percent discount.

RAE scrutinizing greater lignite use, IPTO may need to clarify

RAE, the Regulatory Authority for Energy, is considering to seek clarification from power grid operator IPTO on a series of electricity market issues, including differing formations adopted for the day-ahead and ISP markets.

A first presentation, last week, of the target model’s new wholesale market, energy exchange market results and the energy mix has shown an increase in the use of lignite-fired power stations, despite their higher cost.

Power utility PPC’s lignite-fired power stations are still deemed necessary for electricity supply security, even when capacity levels are sufficient, to counter instability issues at the grid’s northern section, where interconnections facilitate electricity exports.

The use of lignite-fired power stations, such as Agios Dimitrios, Megalopoli IV and Meliti, despite the higher cost of CO2 emission rights, has significantly increased energy costs for suppliers and industry.

Also, when IPTO issues grid distribution orders to lignite-fired power stations, the grid-contribution programs of other units are consequently canceled out and remunerated by the energy exchange, even for energy amounts not contributed to the grid.

Meanwhile, lignite-fired power stations are remunerated through the balancing market at price levels that usually exceed 100 euros per MWh.

RAE’s intervention is intended to ensure the electricity market’s smooth functioning and efficiency, for the benefit of participants and consumers.

PPC asked to replace CO2 clause with wholesale clause

Power utility PPC is facing pressure by RAE, the Regulatory Authority for Energy, to replace its CO2 emission rights price clause with a wholesale electricity price clause adopted by all rival suppliers.

PPC’s decision to activate, early in May, its CO2 emission rights clause in response to rallying CO2 emission right prices has prompted regulatory issues, the authority contends.

PPC was asked, late last month, to explain its decision, as part of a series of meetings organized by the authority with all  suppliers.

RAE, demanding detailed data, is examining whether irregularities exist, the legality of these clauses, and if consumers have been misled.

Independent suppliers have also needed to explain their decisions to activate wholesale price clauses included in  supply agreements. Like CO2 emission right prices, wholesale electricity price levels have also risen.

The authority has received numerous complaints by consumers over costlier electricity bills.

PPC’s low-voltage power bills have risen by levels of between two and three euros since its activation of the CO2-related clause.

Though PPC, the dominant retail player, was the last to activate its clause, it was the first to be summoned by RAE.

CO2 emission right prices have persisted at elevated levels of over 52 euros per ton in recent times, peaking with a record high of 56.65 euros per ton on May 14, before easing slightly in recent days. CO2 emission right prices dropped to 50.14 euros per ton yesterday.

 

RAE launches latest cycle for RES producer certificate applications

RAE, the Regulatory Authority for Energy, has just launched a latest cycle offering RES producer certificates, the third to be held under a new framework. Applicants face a June 10 deadline.

This third cycle for producer certificates, the initial step in the RES licensing process, follows rounds staged last December and February, which attracted applications representing total project capacities of 45.45 and 8.86 GW, respectively.

The authority, which completed processing a backlog of December-cycle applications in mid-April, has announced that 1,544 applications, of 1,865 in total, fulfilled all criteria. These successful applications represent a total project capacity of 34.48 GW.

Applications submitted in the February cycle are still being processed.

Applications blocked by the authority as a result of overlapping properties declared by investors as project sites are, in many cases, being amicably resolved between opposing sides, energypress sources have informed.

It remains to be seen if the big turnout experienced for the December and February cycles will be smaller in this latest cycle, given lower tariffs secured by investors at these previous rounds.

The energy ministry is still entertaining thoughts of requiring investors to accompany their producer certificate applications with letters of guarantee or proof of property ownership.

Market players have expressed concern, noting such measures would emerge belatedly and introduce new rules that have not applied for previous cycles.

 

Ministry committee set to deliver energy-storage framework plan

Facilities operating purely as energy storage stations will be placed under one category for licensing and regulatory purposes, while a separate category will be established for operations combining storage and RES stations, according to a proposal being prepared by a special committee assembled by the environment and energy ministry.

Also, all electricity markets, such as the day-ahead, intraday and balancing markets, will be open to all energy storage units, regardless of category, according to sources.

Units operating as energy storage stations, alone, are likely to receive licenses through an existing framework already used to grant licenses to natural gas-fired power stations, sources informed.

RAE has resorted to this existing framework as a solution to offer production licenses to a number of companies that have lodged applications for large-scale battery facilities.

The committee, set to stage its final session tomorrow, is expected to present a finalized proposal early next week to authorities, including political officials, RAE, the Regulatory Authority for Energy, energy market operators, and the energy exchange.

The energy ministry, placing great emphasis on energy storage as part of the country’s decarbonization strategy, intends to forward the committee’s framework plan for public consultation at the end of June. The ministry plans to submit a related draft bill to Parliament by October 31.

Medium-voltage suppliers seek higher-priced deal revisions

A sharp rise in medium-voltage energy costs over recent times, resulting from higher wholesale prices, threatens to damage the competitiveness of Greek manufacturers, Antonis Kontoleon, president of EVIKEN, the Association of Industrial Energy Consumers, has told energypress.

Rallying CO2 emission right prices as well as persistently higher prices in the day-ahead and balancing markets have prompted electricity suppliers to seek revised medium-voltage agreements as protection against loss-incurring sales.

Electricity suppliers, maintaining business to business agreements with medium-voltage consumers have increased – by 20 percent compared to just recently – their number of requests forwarded for new supply agreements.

More crucially, suppliers are asking their customers to accept upward price revisions.

In many cases, suppliers have forwarded letters to customers informing that they will no longer be able to service existing supply agreements unless prices per KWh are raised.

Low-voltage consumers also face increased electricity bill costs following the activation, by suppliers, of cost-protection clauses.

Independent suppliers have activated wholesale price-related clauses, incorporated in their supply agreements, while power utility PPC has triggered, for the first time, a CO2 emission rights cost-related clause.

RAE, the Regulatory Authority for Energy, has summoned PPC’s administration to offer an explanation on this decision, at a meeting today. The authority is also expected to soon summon independent suppliers.

RAE aiming for July 1 start to Crete grid link hybrid model

RAE, the Regulatory Authority for Energy, has set a July 1 target date for the launch of Crete’s hybrid model enabling the island’s participation in the target model’s wholesale markets, in coordination with the commercial launch of the Cretan small-scale grid interconnection, linking the island’s system with the Peloponnese, also expected to begin operating in July.

The authority yesterday forwarded for public consultation, until June 2, a summary of the proposed regulatory framework to apply until Crete’s full-scale grid interconnection, reaching Athens, is eventually launched. This summary includes a road map leading to the implementation of the hybrid model.

Three days later, all parties involved will submit regulatory texts, for public discussion on the same day. RAE expects to have endorsed these texts by mid-June in preparation for their implementation.

 

Licensing procedure priority for RES investors holding PPAs

RES investors opting to establish bilateral power purchase agreements (PPAs) with industrial consumers will be given licensing priority for the projects over peers planning to secure tariffs the customary way, through RES auctions staged by RAE, the Regulatory Authority for Energy, according to an energy-sector bill expected to be submitted to Parliament in June.

This plan essentially aims to offer investors incentive to stop focusing their efforts on how they will secure fixed tariffs for their RES projects by offering favorable licensing treatment for projects holding bilateral tariff agreements.

Over the next three years, a RES capacity totaling 3.5 GW is expected to be offered by authorities to investors.

It should be pointed out that projects linked to fixed tariffs gained through RES auctions are likely to enjoy more favorable bank treatment for project financing. On the contrary, RES investors holding PPAs will need to have struck handsome deals to convince banks for money.

IPTO to challenge RAE’s €5m fine for west corridor line delay

Power grid operator IPTO will legally challenge a 5 million-euro fine imposed by RAE, the Regulatory Authority for Energy, for delays in the development of a “west corridor” transmission line in the Peloponnese, from Patras to Megalopoli, operator sources have informed energypress.

The authority’s decision is legally baseless and does not serve interests for optimal functionality in the energy market, the sources noted.

The RAE fine imposed on IPTO encourages local reaction in general and is detrimental to the effort being made for swift development of infrastructure projects around Greece, the operator’s sources added.

IPTO has never kept concealed delays it has faced to develop a small fraction of work remaining for the west corridor’s completion as a result of resistance raised by a regional monastery in the Kalavryta area, the operator sources asserted.

As soon as legal action was taken, late last year, against this project’s completion, IPTO informed RAE in writing about the initiative’s repercussions on the development plan, the sources said.

Also, IPTO does not accept any responsibility for balancing market cost increases, which have risen since last November’s target model launch, and will support its position by providing facts and evidence to RAE as well as other Greek and European authorities, the sources told.