Supplier overdue payments to operators reaches €350m

Overdue payments owed by energy suppliers to the country’s market operators have been on the rise since summer, now exceeding 350 million euros, a development that has prompted the government to consider implementing an installment-based payment schedule as part of the solution.

The sharp increase in wholesale electricity prices over recent months has had a severe affect on the cash flow of suppliers, putting them under major financial pressure.

However, it should be pointed out that the majority of this 350 million-euro amount owed by suppliers to operators concerns the power utility PPC and includes a considerable amount owed from long before the current energy crisis.

Power grid operator IPTO, distribution network operator DEDDIE/HEDNO, and RES market operator DAPEEP are all owed sums by the country’s suppliers.

RAE, the Regulatory Authority for Energy, is now considering a three-part solution entailing:  provision of letters of guarantee by suppliers to the operators, to prevent any further rise of the debt owed; immediate deposits covering 50 percent of amounts owed, either in cash or through bank guarantees representing equivalent amounts; and settlement of the remaining 50 percent through an installment-based schedule of between 8 to 12 payments, depending on respective agreements.

Excess RES producer permit applications subdued by action

An energy ministry strategy applied to subdue, to more realistic levels, the number of applications submitted by investors for RES producer certificates, by requiring applicants to provide letters of guarantee worth 35,000 euros per MW, has proven effective.

The number of producer certificate applications submitted to RAE’s (Regulatory Authority for Energy) latest round, for October – the first with the new restrictive measure in place – was limited to approximately 130, representing prospective RES units with a total capacity of 1 GW, energypress sources have informed.

This is well below the levels of all preceding rounds since a legislative revision was ratified to offer investors producer certificates as a first, and more simplified, step in the RES licensing process.

A total of 743 producer certificate applications representing a total RES capacity of 17.45 GW had been submitted to a round in June.

RAE forced to reset Cretan market target model entry for November 1

RAE, the Regulatory Authority for Energy, has reset the target model entry of Crete’s electricity market for November 1, a month beyond a previous date set by energy ministry legislation, to enable full development of information systems to be used by operators and their associates, and also ensure that consumers are better informed on the transition, the authority’s president Thanasis Dagoumas has announced.

This change of date highlights the fact that time had run out for the settlement of pending issues ahead of the previous October 1 launch date for a Cretan hybrid model, intended to offer protection against extreme fluctuations in the balancing market.

As previously reported by energypress, RAE, last week, requested updates from the operators (power grid operator IPTO, distribution network operator DEDDIE/HEDNO, RES market operator DAPEEP) as well as the energy exchange, on their level of readiness, technically, for the Cretan electricity market’s target model entry on October 1.

It can be presumed that at least some of these agencies had not completed actions required in their respective domains for a launch tomorrow.

Crisis Management Committee to examine supply security

The Crisis Management Committee is expected to meet within the first fortnight of October to examine the overall situation in the energy market, driving price levels up to exorbitant levels for consumers of all categories.

The committee’s members will discuss the issue of supply adequacy and security for meeting electricity generation needs, primarily.

Electricity, natural gas and CO2 emission prices are skyrocketing, while natural gas shortages are now emerging in EU markets, all as a result of an extraordinary combination of developments in European markets.

For the time being, Greek energy sector authorities – RAE, the Regulatory Authority for Energy; DESFA, the gas grid operator; and IPTO, the power grid operator – have remained reassuring. Yesterday, RAE president Athanasios Dagoumas noted: “We are not in a state of alarm but are vigilant.”

Overall natural gas consumption is expected to increase in 2021. Consumption was 14 percent higher in the first half compared to the equivalent period a year earlier, DESFA data has shown.

Gas demand rose in July and August to meet increased electricity generation needs and is also expected to be elevated this coming winter.

In Greece, approximately 60 percent of natural gas consumption results from electricity generation. The ongoing withdrawal of coal-fired power stations and greater reliance on fluctuating RES output is expected to lead to a further increase in demand for natural gas.

Local authorities have pointed to Greece’s natural gas source diversification, made possible by the Revythoussa LNG terminal and TAP, both offering alternative solutions, as crucial in the effort to manage the current energy crisis.

Ariadne Interconnection tender for minority stake approved

RAE, the Regulatory Authority for Energy, and the European Commission have approved a plan for a tender to offer a minority stake in power grid operator IPTO’s subsidiary firm Ariadne Interconnection, established specifically for the development of the Crete-Athens interconnection.

An initial plan for the sale of a 40 percent stake in Ariadne Interconnection is now expected to be lowered by IPTO, offering a reduced share, analysts believe.

The tender is likely to be announced by IPTO towards the end of the year, or possibly early in 2022. The procedure will be preceded by a roadshow pitching the tender and company that has taken on the Crete-Athens interconnection, a project budgeted at one billion euros.

Market officials believe the prospect of a minority stake in Ariadne Interconnection will most likely attract funds. China’s State Grid, holding a 24 percent stake in IPTO, has also expressed early interest.

The Crete-Athens interconnection project, currently in progress, is expected to be completed late in 2023 or early 2024.

It was originally planned as a segment of EuroAsia, a wider interconnection plan of PCI status to link the Greek, Cypriot and Israeli electricity grids, with EuroAsia, a consortium of Cypriot interests, at the helm. IPTO eventually withdrew the Crete-Athens segment for its development as a national project.

Higher steel prices increase project costs in DESFA’s development plan

Gas grid operator DESFA’s latest development plan, covering 2022 to 2030, includes project cost increases as a result of higher steel prices in international markets, sources have informed.

The plan, carrying national-grid upgrade, reinforcement and expansion projects, is expected to be forwarded to RAE, the Regulatory Authority for Energy, within October.

It will then undergo two rounds of public consultation procedures, the objective being for RAE to have approved the development plan by the end of the year.

 

Crete market’s target model entry behind schedule

Delays observed in technical preparations by operators for the target model entry of Crete’s electricity market have resulted in pending issues that could prevent next month’s launch date from being achieved.

The energy ministry has prepared legislative revision stipulating a launch of a hybrid model for Crete on October 1.

In response to the delay, RAE, the Regulatory Authority for Energy, will request updates from the operators (power grid operator IPTO, distribution network operator DEDDIE/HEDNO, RES market operator DAPEEP) as well as the energy exchange, on their level of readiness, technically, for the Cretan electricity market’s target model entry at the beginning of next month.

RAE will reset the current launch date if it judges preparations to be at an unsatisfactory level. A one-month extension, for a November 1 launch, is possible.

 

 

RAE adopts new redispatching system, producers fear cost increases

RAE, the Regulatory Authority for Energy, has decided to move ahead with an energy balancing and redispatching plan in accordance with a formula prepared by power grid operator IPTO following a meeting yesterday between representatives of ESAI, the Hellenic Association of Independent Power Producers, and IPTO.

Public consultation was also staged by RAE on the IPTO formula, prepared by the operator after being commissioned by the authority.

ESAI has expressed concern about the new plan, warning that changes to the current system could increase, rather than contain, balancing costs in the wholesale electricity market, amongst other dangers.

Natural gas-fired electricity producers noted that balancing market revisions decided on ought to have undergone an extensive trial period before being implemented.

 

Assessment of June cycle producer certificate bids by end of month

The assessment by RAE, the Regulatory Authority of Energy, of RES production certificate applications submitted to the June cycle is progressing and should be completed by the end of September, energypress sources have informed.

Barring no complications, such as overlapping RES property issues, applicants should receive related emails by early October requesting payment of producer certificate fees to DAPEEP, the RES market operator. Successful applicants will be given 20 day-periods to pay this fee.

A total of 743 applications for RES units representing a total capacity of 17.4 GW were submitted to RAE for the June cycle, the authority has announced. Solar energy units, totaling 302 and representing 12.8 GW, were the cycle’s dominant RES technology, followed by wind energy units, reaching 290 in total for 4.2 GW.

Meanwhile, RAE is preparing to establish a 35,000-euro letter of guarantee as a prerequisite for applications, this measure’s objective being to limit applications to RES investors with serious intentions.

The authority launched a brief public consultation procedure on Friday. It concludes tomorrow, paving the way for the energy ministry’s draft bill for the letter of guarantee measure’s implementation.

 

Network users to cover 50% of South Kavala UGS project cost

RAE, the Regulatory Authority for Energy, has approved guidelines specifying how the development cost will be shared for an underground natural gas storage facility (UGS) at the almost depleted natural gas field of “South Kavala” in the Aegean Sea’s north, thereby settling one of the main regulatory issues that remained for an ongoing tender offering use, development and operation of the facility.

According to the RAE decision, 50 percent of the project’s cost will be passed on to gas network users. As for the other 50 percent, 35 percent is expected to be covered through EU funding, assuming the project is included on the EU’s Projects of Common Interest (PCI) list, while the remaining 15 percent will be taken on by the eventual investor.

In the event that the UGS is excluded from the EU’s PCI list, the Greek State will consider becoming a project partner so that the cost for gas network users is not increased.

DESFA-GEK TERNA and Energean Oil & Gas have advanced to the second round of a project tender staged by privatization fund TAIPED.

The almost depleted natural gas field, where the UGS will be developed, is located 18 km south of the main coastline of Kavala, roughly 6 km west of the island Thasos, at a sea depth of 52 meters.

HEDNO executive bonuses excluded from operating costs

RAE, the Regulatory Authority for Energy, has forbidden the operating-expense inclusion of bonus amounts offered by distribution network operator DEDDIE/HEDNO to its executives, a decision reached through the authority’s approval of the operator’s allowed regulatory income for 2021 to 2024 and required revenue for 2021.

The bonus amounts set aside by the operator for executives are worth a total of one million euros, for one year.

RAE rejected the inclusion of this amount in HEDNO’s operating expenses by pointing out that bonus payments for executives do not offer any benefits to users of the distribution network.

HEDNO to use electricity theft reserve sum for operating costs

Distribution network operator DEDDIE/HEDNO is expected to cover some of its operating costs using electricity theft reserve money, following a decision by RAE, the Regulatory Authority for Energy, approving the operator’s allowed regulatory income for 2021 to 2024.

The electricity theft reserve money to be used by the operator totals 10.04 million euros.

RAE considers appropriate the allocation of this amount for partial coverage of DEDDIE/HEDNO’s allowed regulatory income as the operator has not indicated it would utilize the sum for other matters.

According to provisions in network management rules, amounts collected in the electricity theft reserve may, following RAE approval, be used to offset financial losses of consumers as a result of network electricity theft, as long as there is no immediate need, or specific proposals by the network operator, to finance actions intended to improve electricity theft detection and limit such practices.

Industrial consumers support RAE action for retail market revisions

EVIKEN, the Association of Industrial Energy Consumers, has, in public consultation staged by RAE, the Regulatory Authority for Energy, backed the authority’s initiative for prospective revisions to retail electricity rules, noting competition is being affected by coordinated actions from suppliers.

In its letter submitted to the public consultation procedure, EVIKEN reminds that it has called for decisive intervention by RAE, noting that the supply market, in the absence of fundamental conditions fostering competition – a situation for which vertically integrated energy companies, especially private sector companies, are responsible – can be characterized by coordinated practices that aim to fully transfer to customers price risks entailed in day-ahead and balancing markets.

EVIKEN, in its letter, demanded data illustrating the number of days over the past two months when electricity production technologies (lignite, natural gas, hydropower and imports) determined prices in the day-ahead market.

Smart meter installations to combat rising electricity theft

The replacement of conventional power meters around the country with digital power meters planned by distribution network operator DEDDIE/HEDNO, a long-awaited project now scheduled to commence in 2022 and be completed by 2030, will reduce electricity theft by an average of 5.1 percent per year between 2020 and 2031, eventually reducing it to 0.2 percent of overall consumption, a level registered in 2003 and 2004, RAE, the Regulatory Authority for Energy has projected.

Electricity theft in Greece has risen twentyfold over the past fifteen years. Even though DEDDIE/HEDNO has pointed out that the pandemic-induced economic slowdown since 2020 will raise obstacles in the effort to reduce electricity theft, RAE insists the installation of smart meters will directly combat the problem by enabling officials to swiftly identify where electricity theft is being committed.

Electricity theft in Greece has risen from 0.2 percent of overall consumption in 2003 and 2004, to 1.1 percent between 2011 and 2013, 3.9 percent in 2015 and 2016, and 4.4 percent in 2018 and 2019, official data has shown.

 

DEPA: CNG, LNG supply in remote areas must be competition-based

Gas company DEPA Commercial has objected to a RAE (Regulatory Authority for Energy) proposal calling for the development of distribution networks at remote areas for CNG and LNG supply, noting, in related public consultation, that such a move would not reflect international practices, according to which CNG and LNG compression and transportation activities are taken on by suppliers based on free market competition conditions and prospects.

The RAE proposal for CNG and LNG distribution networks covering supply in remote areas is extremely restrictive and does not allow for alternatives that would facilitate greater competition and reduced costs for consumers, DEPA Commercial contended.

Also, any decision to develop virtual pipeline networks in remote areas should serve as a temporary solution and ensure that the normal development of distribution networks is not undermined, DEPA Commercial noted.

Gas grid operator DESFA, in its contribution to the public consultation procedure, noted that if a virtual pipeline network is regarded as part of the national grid, then this would help boost social welfare, minimize any potential burden on existing gas consumers, and maximize the positive impact of natural gas penetration in Greece.

 

 

Suppliers object to RAE key proposals for power bill terms

The country’s electricity suppliers, across the board, appear to disagree with basic proposals forwarded by RAE, the Regulatory Authority for Energy, in public consultation concerning the  reshaping of electricity bill clause rules.

Suppliers disagree with a RAE proposal calling for the elimination of a penalty clause linked to premature exits by customers from floating tariff agreements. The suppliers also object to the authority’s proposal for the cancellation of a fixed surcharge.

In addition, the suppliers question the effectiveness of upper and lower limits, as protective measures for consumers, in floating tariff agreements.

These objections are expected to be submitted by the suppliers to the public consultation process along with alternative measures.

 

 

Operator on standby to restart old power stations on Cyclades

Authorities taking part in a national energy control center emergency meeting yesterday placed the Cyclades islands on red alert as electricity supply to the region was threatened by an extensive fire that broke out in Varybobi, north of Athens.

Power supply to Syros, Paros, Naxos, Mykonos, Tinos and Andros was pressured by the Varybobi fire as these islands are linked to the mainland grid via a subsea cable beginning from coastal Lavrio, southeast of Athens.

The Varybobi fire burnt late into the night but is now reported to have been brought under control by firefighters as four of five fronts have been extinguished. At least 80 houses are reported to have been burnt in the fire. No human casualties have been reported.

The fire-related collapse of two of three key power lines brought the Cyclades, as well as Athens, to the brink of an extensive power outage. Tourism activity is currently high in the Cyclades.

Officials at yesterday’s national energy control center emergency meeting decided to send distribution network operator DEDDIE/HEDNO technicians out to Syros, Paros, Mykonos and Andros, ordering them to restart local diesel-fired power units if supply from Athens is cut.

These units have been sidelined as a result of the subsea cable connections developed to link the islands with the mainland grid.

Late in June, RAE, the Regulatory Authority for Energy, taking into account the extreme weather conditions, grid pressure, as well as the large number of tourists on the islands, had approved a DEDDIE/HEDNO application for the installation of a generator on Santorini for additional generation in case the existing facility on the island falls short of electricity demand. DEDDIE/HEDNO had estimated a possible 8-MW deficit.

 

Energy minister calls emergency meeting, heatwave set to peak

Energy minister Kostas Skrekas is due to visit power grid operator IPTO’s control center in Athens today for an emergency meeting he has ordered to deal with grid sufficiency issues raised by the prolonged heatwave conditions, expected to become even more acute during the week.

Prime Minister Kyriakos Mitsotakis will participate in the emergency meeting along with the head officials of RAE, the Regulatory Authority of Energy, power grid operator IPTO, distribution network operator DEDDIE/HEDNO, and power utility PPC.

The grid is expected to face unprecedented conditions in coming days as electricity demand peaks to reach record levels, prompted by the extreme weather conditions.

The energy ministry has already urged the public to exercise restraint in electricity consumption over the next few days as a means of helping the pressured grid cope with the heatwave’s demands.

The energy minister also staged an emergency meeting yesterday morning with officials of the aforementioned energy sector companies.

Electricity demand today is expected to peak at 9,600 MW, at around 9pm, well over the average peak of 8,115 MW in the first half of 2021.

RAE rethinks 30% wholesale price clause swing limit for bills

RAE, the Regulatory Authority for Energy, appears set to adopt changes proposed by electricity market players for the authority’s package concerning new electricity bill pricing rules, including an appeal by suppliers urging the authority to avoid imposing a 30 percent limit on a clause enabling them to increase or decrease prices in accordance with wholesale price swings.

The authority’s proposal for this 30 percent limit, announced on July 16, prompted considerable reaction from electricity suppliers, who warned it would stifle competition, adding the Greek energy exchange does not possess tools that can offset wholesale-related cost.

Electricity suppliers have incorporated clauses into their electricity bills enabling price adjustments in accordance with wholesale price level increases or decreases.

The imposition of a 30 percent limit, up or down, would inflict even greater financial pain on smaller electricity suppliers, protesting market players warned.

RAE’s revised rules, seeking to offer consumers greater electricity-bill clarity and price-comparing ability, will be forwarded for a follow-up consultation procedure, possibly as early as this Friday. Otherwise, the procedure is seen commencing within August.

RES investors in rush to avoid €35,000/MWh guarantee cost

Thousands of RES investors already holding producer certificates are racing against time to avoid letter-of-guarantee payments of 35,000 euros per MW, which will be avoided if they manage to submit complete applications for finalized connection offers by a February 28, 2022 deadline to distribution network operator DEDDIE/HEDNO or power grid operator IPTO.

This same deadline applies for imminent producer certificates to be issued through last month’s application cycle. RAE, the Regulatory Authority for Energy, has already begun processing these applications submitted in June. If these investors miss the February deadline for finalized connection offers, they too will also face letter of guarantee costs.

From the next cycle – in October – onwards, most applicants will need to submit letters of guarantee worth 35,000 euros per MW. Investors behind smaller projects with capacities of less than 1 MW, strategic investments, projects for public-benefit purposes, as well as projects developed by local authorities and foundations, will be exempted from the upcoming letter of guarantee requirement.

Its prospect is expected to increase the pressure on DEDDIE/HEDNO and IPTO, expected to face an increased inflow of applications over the next few months as investors scramble to meet the February 28 deadline.

The 35,000-euro per MWh letter of guarantee is being introduced to prevent saturation caused by applicants submitting bids but not following up with actual project development.

‘DAPEEP should manage PPAs platform, not energy exchange’

Preparations for the country’s Market Reform Plan, expected to soon be submitted to the European Commission for approval, have prompted a reaction from RES market operator DAPEEP, asserting it should be appointed operator of green-energy power purchase agreements (PPAs) instead of the energy exchange, as has been stipulated in the plan, now undergoing public consultation.

DAPEEP’s objection to the PPA plan, included in the Market Reform Plan, emerged at a meeting staged by RAE, the Regulatory Authority for Energy, uring discussion on the road map for domestic wholesale electricity market revisions.

DAPEEP’s operator’s chief official Yiannis Giarentis protested that the operator has supported the RES sector’s development for years, being at the helm of this market for 20 years, but has now been sidelined as green-energy PPAs, to facilitate bilateral agreements between RES producers and industrial consumers, are about to come into the picture.

RAE will now examine various proposals and views before taking a stance on the matter.

Energy storage interest enormous, applications for over 12 GW

Investment interest for the installation of energy storage units is already considerable, even though related licensing and support mechanism frameworks have yet to be established, data presented yesterday by RAE, the Regulatory Authority for Energy, has shown.

According to the data, RAE, since October, 2019, has received 123 applications for prospective energy storage and pumped storage projects representing a total of 12,229 MW.

Of these applications, 110 concern energy storage systems representing a total capacity of 9,102 MW, the RAE data showed.

To date, RAE has already issued production licenses for 38 energy storage units with a total capacity of 3,582 MW.

A further 12 applications representing 2,447 MW are for pumped storage units, not including a Terna Energy project in Amfilohia, northwestern Greece.

So far, RAE has issued three licenses for pumped storage facilities representing 807 MW.

Energy ministry officials already suspect the energy storage market may experience overheating issues, as has been the case with the RES market.

Market Reform Plan, Adequacy Report rush ahead of break

The energy ministry is striving to offer a swift response to a set of European Commission queries concerning Greece’s updated Market Reform Plan, forwarded for public consultation by RAE, the Regulatory Authority for Energy.

The energy ministry is aiming to submit a finalized plan to Brussels by the end of July, so that the European Commission can process and approve the plan before its officials take off for their summer breaks in August.

The queries forwarded by the European Commission primarily seek clarification and do not raise any fundamental issues, which has given Greek officials hope of the plan’s imminent finalization.

Brussels’ approval of the Market Reform Plan is crucial as it is one of two prerequisites faced by Athens before the government can submit an application for a support mechanism, either a Strategic Reserve, which would compensate power utility PPC for maintaining its lignite-fired power stations on emergency stand-by, or a Capacity Remuneration Mechanism.

The second requirement is Brussels’ approval of an Adequacy Report being prepared by IPTO, Greece’s power grid operator. Its finalization was originally planned for the end of July but this aim now seems set to be delayed by a week or two.

Suppliers united against RAE’s electricity-bill revision proposals

The country’s entire spectrum of electricity suppliers, from power utility PPC, vertically integrated energy groups, to independent suppliers, have all denounced electricity-bill restriction proposals made by RAE, the Regulatory Authority for Energy, which wants to offer consumers greater clarity and price-comparing ability, rejecting the proposed measures as outdated and inconsistent with European standards.

Electricity suppliers across the board contend the proposals, which offer less leeway in the shaping of offers, would stifle competition and ultimately increase tariffs for consumers.

In recent months, suppliers have been forced to activate electricity bill clauses as they have battled to cope with the impact of sharply increased natural gas prices in international markets as well as higher carbon emission right costs, all of which has led to elevated costs for consumers.

Supplier representatives, in comments to energypress, noted that RAE should have already taken other forms of action to protect consumers, pointing out systematic checks for misinformation practices, false advertising and unfair commercial policies.

The authority has proposed a 30 percent limit on clause-related increases and decreases; the termination of fixed costs, noting that, unlike tariffs, directly comparable, fixed costs tend to cause consumer confusion as they can run for one-month or four-month periods; the termination of an early-withdrawal clause, to stimulate greater consumer mobility; as well as electricity supply price inspections every three months, the objective being to counter temporary below-cost offers extended by some suppliers to lure customers.

 

RAE clause revision proposals not embraced by suppliers

A series of electricity bill-clause revisions proposed by RAE, the Regulatory Authority for Energy, seeking greater clarity and price-comparing ability for consumers, have already prompted negative reaction from suppliers, expected to lodge their complaints, in writing, to the authority by Thursday.

In recent months, suppliers have been forced to activate electricity bill clauses as they have battled to cope with the impact of sharply increased natural gas prices in international markets as well as higher carbon emission right costs, all of which has led to elevated costs for consumers.

The authority has proposed a 30 percent limit on clause-related increases and decreases; the termination of fixed costs, noting that, unlike tariffs, directly comparable, fixed costs tend to cause consumer confusion as they can run for one-month or four-month periods; the termination of an early-withdrawal clause, which would stimulate greater consumer mobility; as well as electricity supply price inspections every three months, the objective being to counter temporary below-cost offers extended by some suppliers to lure customers.

In comments to energypress, supplier representatives contended that RAE’s proposed measures would stifle competition and restrict the shaping of offers made to consumers.

RAE is seeking to standardize electricity-bill offers, which would eliminate any leeway available to suppliers for flexibility in their offers, especially when concerning fixed costs, some supplier representatives stressed.

Energy exchange’s gas market trading details forwarded for public consultation

The Hellenic Energy Exchange has forwarded for public consultation a list of proposals it has submitted to RAE, the Regulatory Authority for Energy, concerning natural gas market details ahead of the prospective energy exchange trading of gas products.

Matters addressed include the procedure to be applied to determine energy exchange  participation rights, charges and commissions for gas product transactions, professional competence requirements as well as product specification rules.

According to one proposal, an annual subscription fee of 7,000 euros will be set for participants.

Also, daily commission fees of 0.005 per MWh for gas products traded in the day-ahead and intraday markets has been proposed.

The energy exchange’s public consultation procedure is planned to end August 31.

DESFA considering 2 options for gas transportation to Epirus

Gas grid operator DESFA is examining two alternative solutions for the transportation of natural gas to Greece’s northwestern region of Epirus, one of the company’s most important projects of its ten-year development plan covering 2022 to 2031, still not finalized.

One option being considered by DESFA is an extension of a gas pipeline in west Macedonia, northern Greece, from Ptolemaida all the way to Ioannina, the Epirus prefecture’s capital.

The other solution being considered entails the development of an LNG terminal at Igoumenitsa port, from where a 50-km gas pipeline would be constructed into the Epirus region.

The options will undergo public consultation for comments and observations by market players before RAE, in conjunction with DESFA, decides which of the two will be implemented.

DESFA aims to finalize its ten-year development plan covering 2022 to 2031 within the summer before delivering it to RAE in September.

Operators react against RAE’s net profit deduction proposal

Market operators have disapproved a proposal by RAE, the Regulatory Authority of Energy, to deduct a percentage of their net profit from non-regulated activities, contending this would act as a growth disincentive.

Gas grid operator DESFA’s chief executive Maria Rita Galli expressed the company’s concerns earlier this week, during a press conference, following preceding disapproval by power grid operator IPTO just hours earlier in public consultation focused on a formula for the calculation of permitted and required ESMIE (electricity transmission system) revenue.

The DESFA chief executive told reporters the operator is currently in talks with RAE for an agreement that would satisfy both sides.

Deducting a percentage of net profit from operators represents an older approach that has generally been abandoned today, Galli pointed out. Subjecting DESFA to such a deduction would put the operator in a disadvantageous position compared to other companies.

RAE has informed this disputed deduction would be used for the benefit of electricity transmission system users.

IPTO has proposed that the authority’s deduction be limited to outlays made for non-regulated services.