RAE approval of gas distributor tariffs paves way for DEPA Infrastructure sale

RAE, the Regulatory Authority for Energy, has approved tariffs for gas utility DEPA’s distribution companies EDA Attiki, covering the wider Athens area, EDA Thess, covering Thessaloniki and Thessaly, and DEDA, covering the rest of Greece, a move that paves the way for the sale of DEPA Infrastructure, one of DEPA’s new entities established for the utility’s privatization procedure.

DEPA Infrastructure is now the parent company of the three distribution firms.

RAE examined tariff-related data submitted by the gas distributors before giving the green light.

The authority hesitated to deliver a decision on distributor tariffs over concerns that connection term discounts offered by the distributors could be regarded as a form of state aid.

RAE also appears to have approved revisions made by the distribution companies to their five-year development plans from 2020 to 2024 after making slight alterations.

The revisions by the gas distributors concern the entry of certain areas to networks as well as more rational use of CNG solutions.

The regulatory authority’s approval of the tariffs, development plans of the distribution companies, and their connection term incentives were all a prerequisite for the continuation of the DEPA Infrastructure sale.

Country’s gas distributors striving to meet terms to secure licenses

The country’s three gas distribution companies exclusively covering the Greek market are preparing dossiers including investment plans to be submitted to RAE, the Regulatory Authority for Energy, in efforts to secure operating licenses, yet to be officially granted.

The three natural gas distributors are EDA Attiki, covering the wider Athens area, EDA Thess, serving the Thessaloniki area, and DEDA, covering the rest of Greece.

The three companies, undergoing separate licencing procedures, each need to prove that they are capable of developing investment plans previously submitted.

The authority wants to avoid any overambitious – and ultimately unachievable – network planning by the three distributors to prevent obstructing other investors who could be interested in developing networks.

Distribution companies will risk losing their regional licenses if they do not develop networks as planned.

EDA Thess, sporting a reliable track record, is believed to have made the most progress of the three distributors in its preparation of a five-year plan. EDA Attiki, according to statements made by company officials, is reworking its five-year investment plan, while DEDA, operating in a far wider area, has catching up to do.